Lanai Menu

- Lanai Guide
- Lanai Attractions
- Lanai Activities
- Lanai Events
- Lanai Lodging
- Lanai Dining
- Lanai Regions
- Lanai Towns
- Lanai Transport
- About Lanai




All Hawaii Menu

Introduction
About Hawaii
Hawaiian Music
Photo Gallery

Hawaii Islands
All Islands
Oahu
Maui
Hawaii
Kauai
Molokai
Lanai
Northwest

Hawaii Topics
Things to Do
What to See
Events
Hotels
Restaurants
Transportation
Recipes





Hawaiian Music
Karen Keawehawaii Singing with Raiatea Helm



Hawaii Travel on Facebook Page


ALL HAWAII MENU:


All Hawaii Menu

Introduction
About Hawaii
Hawaiian Music
Photo Gallery

Hawaii Islands
All Islands
Oahu
Maui
Hawaii
Kauai
Molokai
Lanai
Northwest

Hawaii Topics
Things to Do
What to See
Events
Hotels
Restaurants
Transportation
Recipes





Hawaiian Music
Karen Keawehawaii Singing with Raiatea Helm



Hawaii Travel on Facebook Page







Natural and Cultural Highlights of Lanai

Article by the lanai Visitor's Association with information about the natural and cultural highlights of Lanai Island.

Lana'i’s Cathedrals lie underwater or in the purity of a windblown landscape. At the dive site called Cathedrals, an underwater grotto glows with light and the human hand is absent. At Keahikawelo in northwestern Lana'i , wind and time have carved a temple in a canyon of eroded land. In the mountains and at the shoreline, in the vast open spaces of a tiny, secluded island, time has moved slowly and the whispers of the past can be heard.

Lana'i ’s natural and cultural attractions are spread out over 141 square miles, down roads more bumpy than paved, through rainforest and pineapple lands and arid, windswept plains. There are only 30 miles of paved road. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are the norm. In Lana'i ’s rhythm and scale, it may take an hour to go 12 miles, but the landscape is part of the journey. From its summit at Lana'ihale to its 47 miles of coastline, Lana'i is a museum without walls.

About 5 miles from Lana'i City, The Nature Conservancy’s Kanepu’u Preserve is the largest remnant of the dryland forest that scientists believe once covered the medium elevations of all the islands of Hawai'i . The 590-acre preserve is one of Hawai'i ’s most significant; a critical, carefully tended habitat for precious Lama (native ebony), Olopua (native olive), Lana'i sandalwood, Na'u (native gardenia) and 46 other species of native Hawaiian plants. Kanepu‘u is the last dryland forest of its kind in the world, a nature lover’s jewel 1,700 feet above sea level in the quiet central uplands of Lana'i . The area is gated to prevent wild deer and mouflon sheep from disturbing the endangered plants, but visits are allowed.

Article courtesy of the Lanai Visitors Association


Lanai Island Travel Guide

About Maui County

Islands of Hawaii

State of Hawaii Travel Guide


See also:
Pictures of Hawaii
Destinations in Hawaii
Hawaii for Visitors














| About Hawaii | Activities | Attractions | Big Island | Events | Kauai | Kahoolawe | Lanai | Lodging | Maui | Niihau | Kahoolawe | Oahu | Pearl Harbor | Polynesian Cultural Center | Recipes | Transportation | Waikiki |
Shop
Books
Videos
Music
Calendars
Posters

Partner Sites
Hawaiian Music History
California for Visitors
Nevada for Visitors
Arizona for Visitors