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Filipino Immigration to Hawaii

A timeline of Filipino immigration to Hawaii. Includes waves of immigration and the reasons Filipinos immigrated to Hawaii between 1901 and the 1960's.

1901
In 1901, the Hawaii Sugar Planters Association recommended that Hawaii's sugar plantations begin importing Filipino labor.

1906
In 1906, the first 15 Filipino men arrive in Hawaii to work on sugar plantations.

1907
In 1907, an additional 150 male Filipino workers arrived in Hawaii.

1915
In 1915 the Hawaii Sugar Planters Association began establishing individual agreements with their Filipino workers which included employment terms.

1916
More then 18,000 Filipino workers had immigrated to the Hawaiian Islands to work on sugar plantations by 1916,

1917
The United States went to war in 1917, and at that time many Filipino workers joined the U.S. Navy.

1919
Pablo Manlapit organized the Filipino Labor Union in 1919, and be began recruiting Filipino workers from Hawaii's sugar plantations.

1920
In 1920 the Japanese and Filipinos organized a strike for higher wages. They lost that strike, but they learned to work together for the common good. That same year Manlapit joined Japanese labor leaders to form the Higher Wave Movement.

1924
In 1924 Manlapit led an eight-month strike of plantation workers on Kauai. Sixteen workers and four policemen were killed on September 9, 1924 in gun battle between police and Kauai workers.

1925
In 1925, Manlapit, several oth`er leaders, and sixty workers were convicted of conspiracy and were sentenced to two years in prison. Manlapit chose to be deported to the Philippines. (What happened with Manlapit inn 1932???)

1934
On March 24, 1934, the Tyding-McDuffie Act that paved the way for the Philippines to become independent from the United States, also restricted immigration of Filipinos to a quota of 50 per year. One of the reasons for this restriction was the depressed economy in the United States. More inexpensive imported labor meant fewer jobs for U.S. citizens.

1935
In 1935 the Onomea Camps were segregated into Japanese, Filipino, and Portuguese camps.

1945
In 1945 a second wave of Filipinos immigrated to Hawaii, including workers, wives, and children.

1946
In 1946 the third wave of Filipino workers arrived in Hawaii when 6000 plantation workers were recruited. These recruits had to pay their own passage but their wives and children traveled free. In order to qualify for free return to the Philippines, a laborer had towork at least 250 days during 3 consecutive years.

1965
In 1965, after a new immigration bill was signed by President Lyndon Johnson, another group of Filipinos arrived in Hawaii.



Filipino Culture in Hawaii

Asian Cultures in Hawaii

About the Cultures of Hawaii

Hawaii for Visitors


See also
Blog With Hawaii Tourism Posts
Facebook "Hawaii for Visitors" Page
Twitter "Hawaii for Visitors" Feed










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